What Is Congestive Cardiac Failure (CCF)?

Heart failure, sometimes called congestive cardiac failure (CCF), is a condition in which the heart muscle becomes weakened and, as such, it fails to pump as well as it usually does (Better Health AU, 2020).

Welcome to Jen The Medical Writer’s blog. If you are new, thanks for joining. Today we are looking at congestive cardiac failure. Many persons have heard the term heart failure being used, but do you fully understand what it is? If not, that’s OK because in this post, we will cover the basics of congestive cardiac failure. Let’s get into it!

Heart failure, sometimes called congestive cardiac failure (CCF), is a condition in which the heart muscle is weakened and can’t pump as well as it usually does (Better Health AU, 2020).

What is CCF?

Heart failure, sometimes called congestive cardiac failure (CCF), is a condition in which the heart muscle is weakened and can’t pump as well as it usually does (Better Health AU, 2020).

The term Congestive Cardiac Failure refers to the inability of the heart to pump blood as often, as effectively, and as robustly as needed. This unfortunate phenomenon occurs because, for some reason, this incredibly sophisticated organ becomes weakened. Heart failure can be caused by several factors, including scarring, hypertension, myocarditis, toxic damage, thyroid disease, and diabetes.

Our heart is a muscle whose parts can change in size and thickness. In a person with heart failure, one or both ventricles are unable to empty completely. When this happens, the heart does not pump effectively and gets stiff. It then causes the ventricles to fill with blood. The pooling of blood in them is a result of incomplete emptying on each heartbeat.

Consequently, pressure builds up, and the heart is unable to function as it typically would. It results in incredible strain being placed on the heart. As such, it needs to be treated with medicines such as diuretics, MRAs, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors, and aldosterone blockers. Lifestyle changes and treatment of underlying factors such as high blood pressure, kidney or lung diseases, or anemia can also enhance the management of a CCF. In severe cases, it might be necessary to undergo surgeries for the insertion of cardiac devices or the replacement of valves, a coronary bypass, or even a heart transplant. Speak to your primary care provider before undertaking any additional management.

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