What is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a chronic (long-lasting) metabolic health condition that affects how your body turns food into energy.

Welcome to Jen The Medical Writer’s blog. If you are new, thanks for joining. Today we are looking at #diabetes also known as high blood sugar. In this post, we will take a summarized look at this condition that affects millions globally. I love to spread awareness, so if you have questions, comment below, or send me an email via the contact page. Let’s get into it!

Diabetes is a chronic (long-lasting) metabolic health condition that affects how your body turns food into energy. Most of the food you eat is broken down into sugar (also called glucose) and released into your bloodstream.

What is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a chronic (long-lasting) metabolic health condition that affects how your body turns food into energy. Most of the food you eat is broken down into sugar (also called glucose) and released into your bloodstream. Diabetes occurs when your blood glucose is too high (CDC, 2020).

The term #diabetes describes three types of disorders revolving around the release of the hormone called insulin. An organ located just behind our stomach, the pancreas, has the important job of releasing enzymes that break down the foods we eat. It focuses on sugars, fats, and starches. This organ helps our digestive process by producing the hormones #insulin and glucagon from the foods we consume. It then releases the #insulin in response to the level of sugar in our blood.

When the pancreas produces very little or no insulin at all, or when the body does not properly respond to insulin, we find ourselves in the complex realm of diabetes. Changes in hormone levels can affect the production of insulin, such as, for women, during menstruations, menopause, and pregnancy: it is even more important to keep our blood sugar levels under control in these times. Diabetes adversely affects the way our body uses the food we consume to produce energy. For now, diabetes has no cure but can be steadily maintained and treated.

People with diabetes can conduct a rather normal life, provided they follow a healthy diet, have regular physical activity, stay hydrated, and take their prescribed medication.

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